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Culture of Corruption: Obama and His Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks, and Cronies by Michelle Malkin – Wonderful, Disturbing Read

Culture of Corruption: Obama and His Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks, and Cronies by Michelle Malkin

Barack Obama’s approval ratings are at an all-time low. A recent Gallup poll found that half of the Americans polled said Obama did not deserve a second term. Weary of the corruption that gushes from the White House faster than a Gulf Coast oil spill, voters are ready to put a cap on smear campaigns, pay-to-play schemes, recess appointments, and Chicago politics.

In the updated paperback edition of her #1 New York Times bestselling book Culture of Corruption: Obama and His Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks, and Cronies, Michelle Malkin says, ?I told you so,” citing a new host of examples of Obama’s broken promises and brass knuckled Chicago way.

Culture of Corruption proves once again this isn’t just any politics. It’s ?boodle”-clogged, dissent-squelching, redistributive Chicago politics. The 2010 elections promise to be an anti-corruption referendum for the history books. ?After all,” Malkin says ?You can’t reform corruptocrats, but you can vote them out.” New revelations in the updated Culture of Corruption:


How Obama has declared war on independent government whistleblowers?with unannounced firings, smear campaigns, and forced silence?when their findings expose his political allies.
How First Lady Michelle Obama’s campaign against childhood obesity is less about reducing our youths’ waistlines and more about swelling SEIU coffers with nearly 400,000 new food service workers.
How, despite the exposure of ACORN’s illegal practices and subsequent defunding, ACORN still remains?and why the Obama White House remains tight-lipped on the future of ACORN.
How Obama is using recess appointments to install politicos when both Democrats and Republicans have torpedoed the nominations.
How the White House is manipulating key races across the country, including endorsing such candidates as Alexi Giannoulias?a mob-linked, scandal-tainted banker from Obama’s hometown.

Powerful, damning, and comprehensive, the paperback edition of Culture of Corruption reveals the ever-growing mountain of sleaze and self-dealing that the Obama administration would rather you not know.


3 Year Old President With 2 Year Old Staff 1 Year Old Supporters
This is another book that you will stay up at night, you will not be able to believe what you are reading. You will ask yourself “Am I in American?” or “Where in the hell am I”. This is another book that I have told my Dem and Rep friends and family to look at this, as Glenn Beck says, “No with your eyes and the eyes of the founders but look at this with the eyes of not only a person that wants to take us a 3rd world country but a complete STAFF, SUPPORTERS and two Houses on the left that are willing to a place we may not be able to return from”. The man that said he was going to CHANGE are country over 70% said YEA!!!!!!! You must read this book and you will see that you or I did ANY OF THESE THINGS would be in jail for life. Please my fellow Americans DO NOT HEAR WHAT THIS MAN IS SAYING “L-I-S-T-E-N”!!!! And then understand he does not MEAN A SINGLE WORD OF IT. Please, Please, Please for are Country, VOTE on 2010 and then on 2012 to get rid of this Ass.

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Culture of Corruption: Obama and His Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks, and Cronies by Michelle Malkin

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The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower, Book 1) by Stephen King – Gunslinger

The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower, Book 1) by Stephen King

Thirty-three years, a horrific and life-altering accident, and thousands of desperately rabid fans in the making, Stephen Kings quest to complete his magnum opus rivals the quest of Roland and his band of gunslingers who inhabit the Dark Tower series. Loyal DT fans and new readers alike will appreciate this revised edition of The Gunslinger, which breathes new life into Roland of Gilead, and offers readers a clearer start and slightly easier entry into Rolands world.

King writes both a new introduction and foreword to this revised edition, and the ever-patient, ever-loyal constant reader is rewarded with secrets to the seriess inception. That a magic ream of green paper and a Robert Browning poem, came together to reveal to King his ka is no real surprise (this is King after all), but who would have thought that the squinty-eyed trio of Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach would set the author on his true path to the Tower? While King credits Tolkien for inspiring the quest and magic that pervades the series, it was Sergio Leones The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly that helped create the epic proportions and almost absurdly majestic western backdrop of Rolands world.

To King, The Gunslinger demanded revision because once the series was complete it became obvious that the beginning was out of sync with the ending. While the revision adds only 35 pages, Dark Tower purists will notice the changes to Allies fate and Rolands interaction with Cort, Jake, and the Man in Black–all stellar scenes that will reignite the hunger for the rest of the series. Newcomers will appreciate the details and insight into Rolands life. The revised Roland of Gilead (nee Deschain) is embodied with more humanity–he loves, he pities, he regrets. What DT fans might miss is the same ambiguity and mystery of the original that gave the original its pulpy underground feel (back when King himself awaited word from Rolands world). –Daphne Durham

Late To Join The Quest
For a long time I resisted buying and reading these books. I don’t quite know why. I like Stephen King. I like post-apocalyptic dark fantasy alternative reality. But for some reason, I just balked. Then I finally gave in and managed to get almost all of them within a couple weeks (except Wolves of the Calla (The Dark Tower, Book 5), which I’ve only just managed to track down, leaving me hanging half-way through for some months), and I started reading. What a world, what a world – and what a fascinating character is Roland Gilead, the last of the gunslingers.

From the sounds of things, Roland is ageless, near immortal, and has been chasing after the Man in Black for a very long time. It is while chasing the Man in Black through the desert that Roland meets up with the boy Jake at an abandoned way station – and Jake appears to be from our world; how he got to Roland’s world is a mystery.

I won’t ramble on about the plot – there are over 500 reviews here, plus long editorial reviews and I’m sure the plot is expressed well by someone else. I tend to throw out spoilers when I try, so I won’t waste your time. I’ll just say this: if you, like me, are unsure whether to go ahead and read these books – stop second-guessing yourself and go for it. Not only is the story entertaining, but it is also multi-layered. I have a feeling that reading it multiple times will result in multiple understanding – I’ve actually just finished reading it for the second time in less than a year, since I just got Wolves of the Calla (The Dark Tower, Book 5) and thought it best that I re-read the first four books before going on, so I can refresh my memory, and I can see things I’ve missed. I think people who aren’t generally fans of Stephen King’s works might still enjoy The Dark Tower series, because it is different than his usual fare in many ways, even though it has webs of other stories that occasionally wind through it. Definitely give this series a try.

For More 5 Star Reviews and The Lowest Price Visit:
The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower, Book 1) by Stephen King

The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower, Book 1) by Stephen King – Late To Join The Quest

Thirty-three years, a horrific and life-altering accident, and thousands of desperately rabid fans in the making, Stephen Kings quest to complete his magnum opus rivals the quest of Roland and his band of gunslingers who inhabit the Dark Tower series. Loyal DT fans and new readers alike will appreciate this revised edition of The Gunslinger, which breathes new life into Roland of Gilead, and offers readers a clearer start and slightly easier entry into Rolands world.

King writes both a new introduction and foreword to this revised edition, and the ever-patient, ever-loyal constant reader is rewarded with secrets to the seriess inception. That a magic ream of green paper and a Robert Browning poem, came together to reveal to King his ka is no real surprise (this is King after all), but who would have thought that the squinty-eyed trio of Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach would set the author on his true path to the Tower? While King credits Tolkien for inspiring the quest and magic that pervades the series, it was Sergio Leones The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly that helped create the epic proportions and almost absurdly majestic western backdrop of Rolands world.

To King, The Gunslinger demanded revision because once the series was complete it became obvious that the beginning was out of sync with the ending. While the revision adds only 35 pages, Dark Tower purists will notice the changes to Allies fate and Rolands interaction with Cort, Jake, and the Man in Black–all stellar scenes that will reignite the hunger for the rest of the series. Newcomers will appreciate the details and insight into Rolands life. The revised Roland of Gilead (nee Deschain) is embodied with more humanity–he loves, he pities, he regrets. What DT fans might miss is the same ambiguity and mystery of the original that gave the original its pulpy underground feel (back when King himself awaited word from Rolands world). –Daphne Durham

Very Good
For a long time I resisted buying and reading these books. I don’t quite know why. I like Stephen King. I like post-apocalyptic dark fantasy alternative reality. But for some reason, I just balked. Then I finally gave in and managed to get almost all of them within a couple weeks (except Wolves of the Calla (The Dark Tower, Book 5), which I’ve only just managed to track down, leaving me hanging half-way through for some months), and I started reading. What a world, what a world – and what a fascinating character is Roland Gilead, the last of the gunslingers.

From the sounds of things, Roland is ageless, near immortal, and has been chasing after the Man in Black for a very long time. It is while chasing the Man in Black through the desert that Roland meets up with the boy Jake at an abandoned way station – and Jake appears to be from our world; how he got to Roland’s world is a mystery.

I won’t ramble on about the plot – there are over 500 reviews here, plus long editorial reviews and I’m sure the plot is expressed well by someone else. I tend to throw out spoilers when I try, so I won’t waste your time. I’ll just say this: if you, like me, are unsure whether to go ahead and read these books – stop second-guessing yourself and go for it. Not only is the story entertaining, but it is also multi-layered. I have a feeling that reading it multiple times will result in multiple understanding – I’ve actually just finished reading it for the second time in less than a year, since I just got Wolves of the Calla (The Dark Tower, Book 5) and thought it best that I re-read the first four books before going on, so I can refresh my memory, and I can see things I’ve missed. I think people who aren’t generally fans of Stephen King’s works might still enjoy The Dark Tower series, because it is different than his usual fare in many ways, even though it has webs of other stories that occasionally wind through it. Definitely give this series a try.

For More 5 Star Reviews and The Lowest Price Visit:
The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower, Book 1) by Stephen King

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values (P.S.) by Robert M. Pirsig – Read And Then Read Again!

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values (P.S.) by Robert M. Pirsig

In his now classic Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Robert Pirsig brings us a literary chautauqua, a novel that is meant to both entertain and edify. It scores high on both counts.

Phaedrus, our narrator, takes a present-tense cross-country motorcycle trip with his son during which the maintenance of the motorcycle becomes an illustration of how we can unify the cold, rational realm of technology with the warm, imaginative realm of artistry. As in Zen, the trick is to become one with the activity, to engage in it fully, to see and appreciate all details–be it hiking in the woods, penning an essay, or tightening the chain on a motorcycle.

In his autobiographical first novel, Pirsig wrestles both with the ghost of his past and with the most important philosophical questions of the 20th century–why has technology alienated us from our world? what are the limits of rational analysis? if we cant define the good, how can we live it? Unfortunately, while exploring the defects of our philosophical heritage from Socrates and the Sophists to Hume and Kant, Pirsig inexplicably stops at the middle of the 19th century. With the exception of Poincaré, he ignores the more recent philosophers who have tackled his most urgent questions, thinkers such as Peirce, Nietzsche (to whom Phaedrus bears a passing resemblance), Heidegger, Whitehead, Dewey, Sartre, Wittgenstein, and Kuhn. In the end, the narrators claims to originality turn out to be overstated, his reasoning questionable, and his understanding of the history of Western thought sketchy. His solution to a synthesis of the rational and creative by elevating Quality to a metaphysical level simply repeats the mistakes of the premodern philosophers. But in contrast to most other philosophers, Pirsig writes a compelling story. And he is a true innovator in his attempt to popularize a reconciliation of Eastern mindfulness and nonrationalism with Western subject/object dualism. The magic of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance turns out to lie not in the answers it gives, but in the questions it raises and the way it raises them. Like a cross between The Razors Edge and Sophies World, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance takes us into the high country of the mind and opens our eyes to vistas of possibility. –Brian Bruya

Read And Then Read Again!
I first read this masterpiece of fiction when I was fifteen, I remember clearly it was 1980 and I spent days in my room trying to understand the big words and attempting to figure out all the characters Pirsig would reference, Kant, Hume, Poincare, and the ancient Greeks. Since we were well before a simple Wikipedia search, it would be years before I would hear most of their names again. What I do remember very clearly is that when I emerged from my room I knew I was going to college to become a Mechanical Engineer. I had long since forgotten why I came to that conclusion until I relived my young experience on page 176 just a few days ago. It was my third reading of this great book.

My second reading came in 1992, I was 28. In those days I was brash, arrogant, and full of gumption, as Pirsig would call it. I knew a lot more about philosophy and theology and engineering then I did my first time through. I also owned a motorcycle and had completed an active duty tour in the military. I was working as a systems engineer for the DoD and was in school working on my second Master’s degree. The book still made sense… a lot of sense. At that point I knew it had nothing to do with Zen and even less to do with motorcycle maintenance, but Pirsig has always told us that up front.

Fast forward sixteen years…a family, a company, a new career, a fresh read. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance is still every bit the masterpiece it was back in 1974. But then what is it about – if it’s not about Zen or art of motorcycle maintenance? Certainly much has been written over the past four decades attempting to define exactly what Pirsig was trying to tell us. No need for that. Read the book, Pirsig will tell you. No matter what you may hear, no matter what you may think, this book defines for us that which can never be expressed through words and rational thought alone. It must be experienced. Experience is the life changer, not thoughts or deeds. Experience this book and understand why.

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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values (P.S.) by Robert M. Pirsig

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-free Productivity by David Allen – Simple Steps To Stress-Free Productivity

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-free Productivity by David Allen

With first-chapter allusions to martial arts, flow, mind like water, and other concepts borrowed from the East (and usually mangled), youd almost think this self-helper from David Allen should have been called Zen and the Art of Schedule Maintenance.

Not quite. Yes, Getting Things Done offers a complete system for downloading all those free-floating gotta-dos clogging your brain into a sophisticated framework of files and action lists–all purportedly to free your mind to focus on whatever youre working on. However, it still operates from the decidedly Western notion that if we could just get really, really organized, we could turn ourselves into 24/7 productivity machines. (To wit, Allen, whom the New Economy bible Fast Company has dubbed the personal productivity guru, suggests that instead of meditating on crouching tigers and hidden dragons while you wait for a plane, you should unsheathe that high-tech saber known as the cell phone and attack that list of calls you need to return.)

As whole-life-organizing systems go, Allens is pretty good, even fun and therapeutic. It starts with the exhortation to take every unaccounted-for scrap of paper in your workstation that you cant junk, The next step is to write down every unaccounted-for gotta-do cramming your head onto its own scrap of paper. Finally, throw the whole stew into a giant in-basket

Thats where the processing and prioritizing begin; in Allens system, it get a little convoluted at times, rife as it is with fancy terms, subterms, and sub-subterms for even the simplest concepts. Thank goodness the spine of his system is captured on a straightforward, one-page flowchart that you can pin over your desk and repeatedly consult without having to refer back to the book. That alone is worth the purchase price. Also of value is Allens ingenious Two-Minute Rule: if theres anything you absolutely must do that you can do right now in two minutes or less, then do it now, thus freeing up your time and mind tenfold over the long term. Its commonsense advice so obvious that most of us completely overlook it, much to our detriment; Allen excels at dispensing such wisdom in this useful, if somewhat belabored, self-improver aimed at everyone from CEOs to soccer moms (who we all know are more organized than most CEOs to start with). —Timothy Murphy

Roadmap For Productivity…
The book this week was Getting Things Done The Art of Stress Free Productivity by David Allen. A great book about how to… well… get things done. Personally, I believe two big portions of professional conduct are organization and producing results. This book will teach you how to change your lifestyle and get enormous results in each of those areas.

This book was incredibly detailed. I would be shocked if someone told me they couldn’t get results after reading this because some of the baby-steps the author uses are almost excruciating. But to be fair, that is what it takes with some people to install life changing behavior. Now let’s talk about a couple concepts from this book you can implement in your life to make you a better, more professional, and overall, a more promotable individual.

The BIG idea from this book is simple. Write ‘stuff’ down. Somehow, find a way to transcribe ideas to a device. This device can be a notepad, a cell phone notebook, a PDA, etc. (I have started using a memo pad, you can buy a set of three at Target for $1.97) This idea is so incredibly helpful, yet, I have been battling it for some time. It could be because I was stubborn or that I thought I could do without it. But regardless the reason, I was dead wrong. The brain cannot remember everything you need and at the same time release the information when it is needed. For those of you familiar with computers… The brain processes ideas a computer uses RAM, it’s temporary storage. As amazing as the human mind is, it’s kind of dumb, as the author points out… when you are at the store looking at the battery section you don’t think of the flashlight you have a home with dead batteries. You know that the batteries have been dead, but your mind just doesn’t use that memory when it’s most effective for you to have it. Your brain will shoot out ideas all day long… “I need to take my dry cleaning”… “I need to get buns at the store”… “I need to take that package to the post office.” Those ideas come into your RAM and unless you focus on them until they are done, they will leave you. You can conjure up that idea again, but the time to conjure takes time and depending on the task… unnecessary stress. If you immediately transcribe all the ideas you have as soon as they come in you won’t be using up brain space for that task anymore, and you won’t have a delay in you day trying to come up with the idea again. It is much more valuable to be thinking about different things than it is to think of different things. Use the power of your brain to make your action plan most effective instead of just sitting around thinking about things to do. It doesn’t even matter what the idea is, if you transcribe it you will review it later and weed out the useless. The important part is that all ideas that come in are going out of your brain and onto something reviewable.

I started transcribing ideas earlier this week and have had tremendous results. I can’t put an accurate percentage on my increased efficiency. But if I were to ballpark it, I would say I am around 60% more efficient. I know… pretty impressive.

The next step is to review. Weekly you should do a review of your notes and weed out information. If it is something that is not actionable then you can either: discard it, save it for a reference, or but it in a someday/maybe file. If it is actionable then you need to come up with an action plan. Your idea to get your car tuned up becomes actionable by breaking it down. You’ll need to look for different mechanics’ rates, make a decision, and make an appointment. When things are broken down you have a clear, concise road map. In addition to your weekly review, you will be referring to your transcription device very regularly. As soon as one task gets done you should have another task on there to work on. The time reviewing won’t be extensive, just a few seconds here and a few there and maybe 15 to 30 minutes to create action plans for your larger projects. The author defines a project as anything that has more than one step to completion.

When your plan is actionable you have a few solutions for getting it done. Do it, Delegate it, or Defer it. I think each of those is pretty obvious so I am not going to Dr. Seuss this for you. But I will show you a work flow diagram that is used frequently in the book. It should give the big picture of what I’m talking about.

The other part of being stress-free while establishing your new lifestyle to know your limits. Your work flow is like a credit card. If you don’t know the balance or limit of a credit card it is easier to be irresponsible. With your work flow you should now know your balance because you should have everything you need to do written down, but your limit is something you will have to decide for yourself. If your plate if full then you need to feel comfortable saying “No” to a new task asked of you. Overloading yourself will cause you to be less productive in the long term because it will weigh you down. But again, this is variable, everybody is going to have a different limit and as you become more effective you will increase your ability to do new task and in essence raise your limit.

There is a lot more to this book than what I have explained here. It goes far more in depth and gives a lot more neat tips on organization and effectively sorting your ‘stuff.’ I think this book is great for most executives that have information coming and going more than most people out there. Having an effective way to deal with all that information flow help in enormous ways. Lastly, don’t be stubborn like me, write things down and review them regularly. You increased efficiency is sure to turn some heads! If you have any questions on the book don’t hesitate to ask. I would be more than happy to help anyone that wants it.

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Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-free Productivity by David Allen

The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd – Excellent Read

The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd

Sue Monk Kidds The Mermaid Chair is the soulful tale of Jessie Sullivan, a middle-aged woman whose stifled dreams and desires take shape during an extended stay on Egret Island, where she is caring for her troubled mother, Nelle. Like Kidds stunning debut novel, The Secret Life of Bees, her highly anticipated follow up evokes the same magical sense of whimsy and poignancy.

While Kidd places an obvious importance on the role of mysticism and legend in this tale, including the mysterious mermaids chair at the center of the islands history, the relationships between characters is what gives this novel its true weight. Once she returns to her childhood home, Jessie is forced to confront not only her relationship with her estranged mother, but her other emotional ties as well. After decades of marriage to Hugh, her practical yet conventional husband, Jessie starts to question whether she is craving an independence she never had the chance to experience. After she meets Brother Thomas, a handsome monk who has yet to take his final vows, Jessie is forced to decide whether passion can coexist with comfort, or if the two are mutually exclusive. As her soul begins to reawaken, Jessie must also confront the circumstances of her fathers death, a tragedy that continues to haunt Jessie and Nelle over thirty years later.

By boldly tackling such major themes as love, betrayal, grief, and forgiveness, The Mermaid Chair forces readers to question whether moral issues can always be interpreted in black or white. It is this ability to so gracefully present multiple sides of a story that reinforces Kidds reputation as a well-respected modern literary voice. –Gisele Toueg

Excellent Read
I liked this book more than I thought I would, but it wasnt what I was expecting. I wasnt really expecting a southern-set fiction book, for some reason I thought it would be one of those heavy literary type books. Boy, was I in for a good surprise! Very well written, a story about a woman going through some sort of middle-age crisis. Stunted by her past, she only is able to move forward by discovering why her mother chops off her own finger. The story is set in South Carolina – a funny on this one, I grew in the lowcountry and I love to read about it and I was racking my brain trying to figure out where this island was, I could not remember such a island. At the end, the author notes that the island is a figment of her imagination… *laugh*

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The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd

Flags of Our Fathers (Movie Tie-in Edition) by Ron Powers – Lessons For A Modern Generation

Flags of Our Fathers (Movie Tie-in Edition) by Ron Powers

The Battle of Iwo Jima, fought in the winter of 1945 on a rocky island south of Japan, brought a ferocious slice of hell to earth: in a months time, more than 22,000 Japanese soldiers would die defending a patch of ground a third the size of Manhattan, while nearly 26,000 Americans fell taking it from them. The battle was a turning point in the war in the Pacific, and it produced one of World War IIs enduring images: a photograph of six soldiers raising an American flag on the flank of Mount Suribachi, the islands commanding high point.

One of those young Americans was John Bradley, a Navy corpsman who a few days before had braved enemy mortar and machine-gun fire to administer first aid to a wounded Marine and then drag him to safety. For this act of heroism Bradley would receive the Navy Cross, an award second only to the Medal of Honor.

Bradley, who died in 1994, never mentioned his feat to his family. Only after his death did Bradleys son James begin to piece together the facts of his fathers heroism, which was but one of countless acts of sacrifice made by the young men who fought at Iwo Jima. Flags of Our Fathers recounts the sometimes tragic life stories of the six men who raised the flag that February day–one an Arizona Indian who would die following an alcohol-soaked brawl, another a Kentucky hillbilly, still another a Pennsylvania steel-mill worker–and who became reluctant heroes in the bargain. A strongly felt and well-written entry in a spate of recent books on World War II, Flags gives a you-are-there depiction of that conflicts horrible arenas–and a moving homage to the men whom fate brought there. –Gregory McNamee

Lessons For A Modern Generation
Simply put, this is historical narrative writing at its best.This terrific book tells the story of the six flag raisers in Joe Rosenthals iconic Pulitzer-Prize winning photograph from Iwo Jima.The author James Bradley is the son of flag raiser John Bradley.Bradley shows how the men in the photograph were a cross section of small town America at the time.He clearly demonstrates how their fate tied into the larger story of Iwo Jima.Three of the six men were killed shortly after the photo was taken in the brutal fighting on the island.The battle scenes are unforgettable.But, this is more then a war story, this is a story of honor,horror, fame and its price and the impact of war that goes on long after the shooting is over.It is a story of good and honest men catapulted into a terrible situation and how they dealt with it.Clearly the amazing characters were much more then just figures in one of the wars most memorable pictures.The opening when the Bradley family visits Iwo and the conclusion when the author remembers his dad and his reluctance to be called a hero along with his wanting to not talk about the war are enough to put a lump in the throat of Scrooge.This is realistic praise of the greatest generation.It shows their strengths and their flaws and it makes me miss my father even more.You will remember this book long after you are done reading. That generation had its problems like we all do, but it faced incredible horror with a strength of character that this book captures.

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Flags of Our Fathers (Movie Tie-in Edition) by Ron Powers